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Ready For The Fall Fishing Season? • Matt Talks Lures • Fishing Update • Crabbing Tips • Crab Dip Recipe • Shark and Tuna Info

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Striped Bass
The first signs of the fall run have are starting to show positive results.  Some cooler days in combination with northeast winds have increased the striped bass activity down at Shinnecock Inlet and Moriches inlets. Schoolies were breaking on "rainbait" (small baitfish ) in the early mornings. With this type of bait around, the best lures to use are small tins and topwater plugs.

J & J Sports outing with Matt and Zeppi (from the shop)... They took a ride to Shinnecock inlet to be greeted by wind and rain. Once the rain stopped they made their way onto the jetty. The conditions looked fishy. Not much going on at first but once the tide started moving in the rain-bait started to break water and go for cover as they were getting harassed by schools of small stripers and cocktail bluefish.
This was a blast fishing with light tackle. Zeppi was using and catching most of his fish using a Joe Baggs epoxy jig. This lure is popular with smaller bass and will work very well with the "Albies" that will make their fall appearance reel soon.
Zeppi also noted that the larger bass migration isn't far away.

Albies
Mark your calendar: the Fishermans Surf Fishing Seminar at the Huntington Hilton September 19th. Great giveaways for the first six hundred attendees, giant raffle and seminars/workshops, Matt from the shop will be giving a seminar: His talk will correspond with his recently published article in the fisherman magazine, " Go-to Plug bag". several other speakers and surf fishing experts will be in attendance; Alberto “Crazy Al” Knie, Bill Wetzel and Bill “Doc” Muller, to just name a few. Hope to see you at the event, please stop by the J&J booth to say hello.

 


Docks
The Local docks are experiencing some great fishing opportunities.  Snappers at the dock have been growing by the day. Right now they are a fun size to catch Fishing small shiners on a #4 or #5 long shank snapper hook under a float will do the trick. Small tins like Kastmasters or Johnson Sprites and Snapper Poppers have also worked well. The trick is to be patient eventually they will bite. Try Patchogue's Mascot Dock, Or any of the Brookhaven Fishing Piers like Blue point or Pine neck docks.
Also in the mix are plenty of Kingfish. Use a hi low rigs with tiny hooks baited with pieces of clam on the bottom. Wait for a tiny nibble and set the hook. They have been plentiful and make a good meal.

Crabbing:

Note: we have crab nets in stock.  Local pick up only.  Call for details 631-654-2311
With the end of August and the start of September Blue Claw Crabs are in abundance along the south shore docks and creeks. There are multiple ways to catch them and all can be very successful
Using a flashlight and crab net at night while walking the dock is a tried and true method. The crabs will cling to the dock and pilings and can be scooped up when you see them with the light. Walking the shallows or drifting in a small boat with a light and net will also work well.Having an extendable net can be very beneficial. Sometimes having one will make those far out of reach crabs easier to reach.

Trapping Crabs in a commercial style trap baited with either Bunker or Mackerel is a great way to get a bunch of Crabs. Check your local regulations before using one of these traps. Commercial style traps must be fitted with a Turtle restricter. These traps have a bait compartment, after going in the crabs can't get out.

Pull crab traps ( spring traps) baited with Bunker or Mackerel are always good to use especially when Snapper fishing. Throw them out and pull up and check every few minutes while fishing. These traps allow the crabs to come and go freely so they must be pulled up repeatedly. This type of trap usually has a bait compartment, if it doesn't the bait must be attached with a wire or zip tie in the center of the trap.

Weighted throw lines are lines with a small lead weight and a ring that you can attach Bunker, Squid, Mackerel or even chicken to. Toss out the line leaving some slack in it. When the crab starts eating the bait the line will start to get tight. Slowly retrieve the line hand over hand and scoop the crab as it gets to the surface.

The size limit on hardshell Blue claw Crabs is 4 1/2 inches point to point on the shell (not the claws) with a limit of 50 crabs per person per day. The size limit on soft shell Blue Claw Crabs is 3 1/2 inches point to point. If you are fortunate enough to catch a few soft shell crabs do not put them in your bucket with the other crabs, they will eat them.

The way to tell the difference between a male and a female crab is to look at the underside of the crab. A female crab will have a V shape or christmas tree shape and the underside of a male crab will have the shape or a Y. Female crabs also have red tips on their claws. All females with egg sacks most be released. The underside of a female crab will have a brown or purple sponge on it if it has eggs.

Blue Claw Crab Dip Recipe:
After steaming, clean 8-10 large Blue Claw Crabs putting the meat in a glass bowl, be careful to remove any small pieces of shell. Add 1 package soft cream cheese, 1 tablespoon of Old Bay, 1 teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce, 1 teaspoon of crushed garlic (wet), and 1/2 0f a white onion finely chopped. Mix thoroughly, cover and refrigerate for 45 minutes. serve with Ritz crackers. ...More Recipes

Fluke
Still plenty of Fluke to be caught right now before they start making the trip back offshore again. The bays have ac combination of shorts and keepers in each drift. The key is persistence. Keep culling through shorts to get your legal sized fish.

In the ocean off Moriches and Shinnecock- in about fifty feet of water - some nice Fluke have been "setting up" for their migratory trip. A few more keepers are coming in the ocean trip. Try using bigger baits to attract bigger fish. Five and six inch gulp, whole squid or large spearing all seem to be producing pulling a few more keepers.
Fishing Montauk off the lighthouse along the sand bottom has surrendered a few large fluke this past week. We heard reports of a few double digit fish.

Porgies
Still a lot of Porgies around on the North Shore as well as the south shore inlets. Plenty of keepers to be caught. There are larger fish on the South shore along the rocks. Clams, sandworms and squid are all great baits. My favorite rig to use is a high low rig. Try going around the high tide for the best results.
Don't be surprised if you catch some triggerfish too. Fun to catch and fine to eat.

Shark and Tuna Fishing? A Permit is Required: 

 Shark Identification Chart (PDF)    

 Tuna Guide (PDF)   

Permit Descriptions: All owners/operators of vessels in the U.S. Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean must obtain a federal permit to recreationally or commercially fish for regulated Atlantic HMS (sharks, swordfish, tunas (bluefin, bigeye, albacore, yellowfin, and skipjack), and billfishes (recreational only; white and blue marlins, sailfish, and roundscale spearfish)

 Click Here To Register 

RECREATIONAL FISHING REGULATIONS FOR SHARKS IN STATE WATERS



Freshwater
The shop is still getting shipments of live shiners every week. Patchogue locals have been using them to hook up with Large Mouth Bass (Black Bass) at the local lakes ( Great Patchogue Lake). Fish them under a small float with a smaller sized hook (#6 eagle claw hook) allowing them to swim naturally. Use nightcrawlers if you want to target smaller panfish. They have been active along the shoreline. 

A New York State Freshwater Fishing License Is Required-Click To Obtain A License Or Stop down at the shop ( J & J Sports ) and we'll sign you up. There's nothing worse than getting a ticket just because you went fishing.


Read more "Stories and Reports" from J&J Sports Blog Posts: Click Here

 

Send your reports, photos or your favorite fish recipe to: REPORTS@JJSPORTSFISHING.COM   Don't forget to include, names, location and details (when possible: lures or bait used, tides, etc….) comments or questions are welcome. Call (631) 654-2311

 

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